Posts Tagged ‘Management’

Mirroring Margaret’s Management Mojo and Leadership

Thursday, April 13th, 2017

It’s safe to say that Margaret is one of the finest managers I’ve ever met. She’s a rare combination of great insight, intelligence, forward thought, deep caring, tremendous leadership, problem solving skills extraordinaire and so much more.

So, you may ask, why aren’t more leaders like Margaret? I wondered too, so I asked her to explain her management philosophy.

Me– It apparent to me and those you work with that you’re a cut above other managers at your company. Why is that?

Margaret– I’m not comfortable comparing myself to other managers. Earlier in my career, I worked on defining my role, what I should be working on, what to delegate and how to “manage up” i.e. my manager.

This thoughtful approach has allowed me to become a better manager. And, others see this approach and are drawn to it. I try to be fair. It’s important.

Me– Aren’t you afraid of getting to close to those you manage i.e. everyone wants to be your friend which could lessen your effectiveness?

Margaret- Everyone doesn’t want to be my friend. While I genuinely care about the people I manage, there is still a difference between personal and professional friendships.

Me- You seem to care a lot, assist others and even have employees from other department coming to you for advice. Why is that?

Margaret- Perhaps all managers are not equal. I guess I have thoughts, ideas and ways to improve their job that they want to bounce off of me. As I said before, I’m a good listener. I cross departments often, I reach out a lot and folks know me. That makes it easier for us to

Me- Sweet! Do you have a management philosophy?

Margaret- Not really, no. I prefer to manage people the way that I would want to be managed. My role is to listen carefully, help others grow, point out ideas that staff may not of seen, reduce barriers, provide other perspectives and help make individuals more productive aka the best they can be.

Me- Okay, so managers are liked, loved despised and tolerated. You are liked and loved. That’s impressive. What’s your advice to other managers?

Margaret- Spend time with the people you supervise. It can be tempting to cancel meetings with your staff, because you have a lot of other things to do. My advice is to always make that meeting happen even if it needs to be postponed. And, some need a personal touch, others with task. If you spend time with them you’ll know!

What is you managing style?

How close to Margaret’s style of managing is your manager’s?

Learn more at www.scottlesnick.com

Leaders, Staff and Excellence

Tuesday, October 27th, 2015

The pendulum has swung back in favor of workers. Businesses are hiring, unemployment is hovering around 5.5% and workers understand that there are many more work options available. Retention is always an issue and now you have to fight hard to keep your best from jumping ship – a right they have and will exercise when appropriate.

Our competition is stronger than ever. Our business goals increase yearly but the leaders with unhappy staff will lose them in the blink of an eye.

New hires understand that the options are out there and will make up their mind within 30 days of starting a job how long they plan on staying.

You ain’t got much time to make them satisfied, comfortable and committed.

Excellence comes from more employee training, a watchful eye on their wants, needs and desires and an overall feeling that they matter and that you care.

When I conduct breakout sessions, I often include an activity that allows us to “deep dive” into issue. Sure I can present but a room full of talent can always come up with more ideas, thoughts and recommendations than one person can offer.

Here is what I learned at three different conferences I presented at this summer about what employees want. I’ve shortened the list down to seven. They are:

  • Training, training and more training. The reason- more knowledge, better opportunity for advancement & improved skills.
  • Cross Training– They want to better understand what others at the same company do and how it affects their role. Plus, they may find an area of the company that they are better suited for.
  • Employee recognition- Sure, you remember when we did more of that! Well, they want it to come back. Gas cards, bonus, lunch. Employees need to hear that they matter, make a difference and are an integral part of your team.
  • Ask them. Asking for feedback and input grows trust and builds relationships. Plus, great ideas can come from anyone at work but you have to ask.
  • Cross mentoring. Attendees have convinced me that mentoring not only works, it moves projects and employees along faster. Because we are now seeing Boomers & Xers specifically working with Millennials and the results are mostly very positive. Millennials can offer fresh perspectives, are a whiz with technology and are fast learners. Older generations have plenty of experience and are often in a higher profile position. Legacies are left by those in their forties and up, mentees advance faster than those who are not mentored and succession planning is stronger as a result.
  • Humor me. Lighten up, lose the “boss” attitude and come down to our level. Today’s best leaders understand that relationships increase productivity, grow business and make for a ‘lower stress’ work environment. No laughter, no fun, no appreciation. Where would you rather work?
  • Social gatherings. We understand that outside of work people let their hair down and tend to relax. Some more than others! New bonds are formed, relationships grow and leaders show their ‘off site’ personality. When offered and organized, the results can be tremendous and the cost to benefit ratio low!

Excellence in anything requires dedication, assistance and time. Today’s leaders lead from the sideline, in the trenches and wherever they can to be effective.

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