Posts Tagged ‘Multi-Generation’

Millennial Mania and the Next Big Productive Wave

Monday, February 4th, 2019

We’ve been hearing, talking and learning about this numerical force of nature for more than a decade.

Now parents themselves, they also hold important positions at companies, in politics and in every other aspect of our lives. They touch our daily existence and we’re better for it.

I gave a keynote to 2000 people recently and mentioned that “some of you are worn out, checked out and even grossed out by the fact that you’re getting older. Right? Yet, your ideas carry weight and your experience is essential, however there IS a new sheriff in town. Personally, I’m often the oldest dude in any room now. And my generation actually began using ‘dude’ way before recent generations.”

Are we finished talking about this group? Have we seen the last of this coddled, tenacious, and social group of 80 million? I don’t believe so. But some people are writing that 2019 is the end of the Millennial discussion. I call these folks delusional! Wishful thinkers that want things THE WAY THEY USED TO BE.

Umm, when is the last time anything stayed the same?

All generations are asking for a healthier workplace with incentives for staying fit, healthier working conditions and open communications from C-Suite to new staff.
 
And, management wants increased productivity from all generations!
 
I offer up solutions in my presentations and training. Among them is the massively important and not so new-idea of having a workplace culture that is built around communicating openly and freely at work. Ideas flow, positive cultural changes are made and workers are essentially happier, plus more productive!
 
The truth can sting. Honesty grows relationships. Open and honest communications that are respectful often lead to greater workplace productivity and staff retention.

I understand that isn’t easy for everyone. However, leaders that want to grow need to do this. Employers that want to spend less money onboarding new staff must do this. And, Boomers, Gen X and Millennials best understand the specific needs of each generation. An hour or two meeting discussing the similarities and differences can yield big dividends for everyone. It can be fun, enlightening and empowering as we begin to prepare for the next big wave-Generation Z.

As we prepare for a generation of approximately 61 million strong, it good to remember that their group size is larger than Gen X but smaller than Millennials.
They are unique (as is every generation) and some have already graduated high school and even college.  However, their way of working and living is more aligned with a “Millennials meet the Silent Generation aka WWII AKA Greatest Gen” hybrid. This means quick to learn, eager to work yet stay in one place and are more conservative with their spending.
 
Marketing professionals have been reaching out to this group for years. And, they have not forgotten Millennials in their advertising either. Over 135 million strong, these two generation offer gigantic numbers of workers, consumers and voters.
 
And, all generations want support with topics ranging mental health issues to free fruit and water; from biking to work incentives and more. Business leaders have begun to recognize the fact that happy, healthy employees mean more productive employees, regardless of generation. Having a wellness plan can also help to attract and retain the best talent.
 
The days of lumping everyone into a specific age group are fleeting but not gone. Recognizing individual talent, providing a healthy work environment and connecting them to your company’s goals through open communications are the new normal.


A workplace that has an open and positive workplace culture grows, matures and retains employees better than ones who do not. And, recognizing the similarities we have and connecting us to one another is essential in maintaining a positive and productive workplace.

What are you doing to connect generations at work? If asked, would your staff agree that your organization has an open workplace environment that creates a culture of ideas, health and is both client and employee-focused?
 
To learn more or to set up time to chat with Scott visit http://www.scottlesnick.com/

5 Reasons Those Damn Millennial’s… Rock!

Monday, April 13th, 2015

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I got lucky when I decided to build a presentation on the 4 to 5 generations currently in the workplace. The topic was hot, the generations unique and Millennials (of course) were getting trashed.

Sure there were some reason for concern, but I would point out to hundreds of attendees they had it wrong. Gasp!

As a baby boomer I remember hearing from previous generations that MY generation wouldn’t amount to much. No work ethic, etc. Checking the scorecard I see that these predictions were incorrect. We’re so quick to criticize younger generations, but each one has done a great job at helping us move forward collectively. Millennials are doing the same!

  • Do you use Facebook? The dude who started it is a Millennial! Okay, that was too easy. But, they are the most tech savvy. They’re eager to learn. This is good!

 

  • They learn quickly. This is great. Their eagerness to grow is part of their culture. Plus, they are the #1 generation in the US AND the #1 generation in the workforce.

 

  • They are far more diverse than previous generations. Plus, more come from single-parent homes, blended families, and families with same sex parents than ever before. This is a fact! And, Millennials are pro women. They work to live not live to work.

 

  • NOT TRUE! Contrary to popular belief this generations does like to work, they simply approach it from a different angle. Many are dependable, innovative and open to trying creative ways of completing tasks. They are social, willing to be mentored and YES they want an opportunity for growth/advancement.
  • Look ahead. Jerks come in all colors, shapes and sizes. So do managers! Thankfully, the same can be said of nice people! Already making a huge impact, todays Millennials are going to be running major companies in 5-10 years. How you treat those younger than you might have an impact on your paycheck. Treat people well because they remember! Treat people poorly and…..